If you have lost a tooth, you may want a dental bridge to close the gap—a more affordable option compared to a dental implant. What Is a Dental Bridge? A…

What to Know About Dental Bridges

What You Should Know About Dental Bridges

If you have lost a tooth, you may want a dental bridge to close the gap—a more affordable option compared to a dental implant.

What Is a Dental Bridge?

A dental bridge is used to close the gap between two teeth when a tooth is missing. It is made up of three parts:

  • Two crowns on either side of the gap
  • The replacement tooth (called a “pontic”), which fills the gap

What Material Is Used for a Dental Bridge?

There are three material options for bridges: 

  • Porcelain (with a metal base)
  • All metal
  • All porcelain

How Much Does a Dental Bridge Cost?

Dental bridges cost around $3,000 to $6,000 without dental insurance. With a dental savings plan, dental bridge costs are cut roughly in half. Costs vary according to the material and how many pieces are required. Most bridges are at least 3 parts—the porcelain/metal replacement tooth and the two crowns surrounding the tooth. 

With a dental savings plan, a dental bridge costs about $1,800 (cutting your bill by more than half!).

Average Cost of a Dental Bridge
Piece of Bridge Cost w/o Dental Insurance  

 

Cost w/1Dental Savings Plan

*Averages of TX, FL, CA & NY

Bridge Replacement Tooth

(Porcelain/High Noble Metal)

ADA Code 6240

$1,517 $562
Bridge Crown (x2)

(Porcelain + High Noble Metal)

ADA Code 6750

$1,536 x 2 = $3,072 $598 x 2 = $1,196
Total Cost $4,589 $1,758

Sign Up for a Dental Plan with 1Dental

What Questions Should I Ask My Dentist About Dental Bridges?

Below are a list of important questions you should ask your dentist about dental bridges:

  1. What steps are involved when getting a bridge?
  2. How long will the process take from start to finish?
  3. What material is best for my situation?
  4. Which material is most cost-effective with my dental insurance or dental plan?
  5. Will any of my eating habits need to change while I’m becoming accustomed to the bridge? Are there certain foods I need to avoid?
  6. Is there anything special that I should know about maintaining and caring for the bridge?
  7. How long do you foresee the bridge lasting?
  8. What are the signs that I should look for to know when it may be time to get a replacement?
  9. Are there questions that I should be asking that I haven’t asked yet?

Natasha is 1Dental’s managing editor and copywriter, focusing content on dental and health news, advice and tips straight from the experts. She graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Mass Communication and has since been a book editor and now copywriter and managing editor on dental and health. You can find her on Twitter and all of 1Dental’s social networks.

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