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No Dental Insurance But Need Dental Crowns?

No Dental Insurance Crown

Crowns are a great protector of your teeth if damage or decay has been found by your dentist. It’s not something you should ignore when your dentist recommends you get a crown. But with every procedure, understanding its purpose and cost is important, especially if you have no dental insurance.

How Much Does it Cost to Get a Dental Crown?

Dental crowns, by themselves, cost anywhere from $300 to $1,400 depending on the type of crown you need. Below are some average prices for each type of crown if you have no dental insurance.

Average Cost of Dental Crowns
Type of Crown Cost Without Insurance
Crown - Resin-Based Composite (indirect) $1227
Crown - Resin with High Noble Metal $1373
Crown - Porcelain Fused to High Noble Metal $1476
Crown - Porcelain Fused to Predominantly Base Metal $1370
Crown - Porcelain Fused to Noble Metal $1411
Crown - Full Cast High Noble Metal $1535
Crown - Full Cast Predominantly Base Metal $1333
Prefabricated Stainless Steel Crown - Primary Tooth $347
Prefabricated Stainless Steel Crown - Permanent Tooth $409

There is a lot that goes into the cost of getting a dental crown beyond just the crown. Below are a few more things you might need with your dental crown, which can range between $100 and $450 per crown with no dental insurance.

Average Dental Crown Work
Treatment Cost Without Insurance
Core Buildup - Including Any Pins $349
Pin Retention Per Tooth in Addition to Restoration $108
Post and Core in Addition to Crown, Indirectly Fabricated $535
Prefabricated Post and Core in Addition to Crown $441

Why Do I Need to Get a Crown?

Dentists most commonly use crowns to:

  • Repair and Strengthen a Damaged Tooth
  • Improve the Appearance of a Tooth
    • The color, shape or even alignment of the tooth.

Types of Crowns

There are many types of crowns you can get. Your dentist will recommend the best one for you depending on your situation and the area of your mouth it needs to go, but here are your typical crown options:

  • Stainless Steel: Stainless steel crowns are used as a temporary measure for permanent and primary teeth. They are most commonly used for children’s teeth because their primary teeth will soon come out, making the stainless steel crown fall off naturally. In adults, more trips to the dental office are required to place this type of crown.
  • Metals: For metal crowns, less tooth structure needs to be removed in preparation for the crown. These crowns probably last the longest as far as wear and tear.
  • Porcelain-fused-to-metal: These crowns look like normal teeth, which is a plus. However, they can have a lot of wear and tear on the opposing teeth when you bite down and chew and the porcelain part of the crown can break off. Porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns are good for front or back teeth.
  • Ceramic or Porcelain: All-ceramic or all-porcelain crowns are a great choice if you’d like the crown to match the natural color of your teeth. These are also a great option for individuals who are allergic to metal. Keep in mind, like other crowns, these can wear down on opposing teeth more than metal or resin crowns.
  • Resin: All-resin dental crowns are the least expensive compared to the other types of crowns listed. However, like other crowns, they do wear down over time and they can fracture more easily than the porcelain-fuse-to-metal crowns.
  • Temporary vs. permanent: Your dentist will be able to advise you on whether temporary or permanent crowns are your best option. Temporary crowns are usually made in a dentist’s office while permanent crowns are created in a dental laboratory.

Crowns and the Careington 500 Series Dental Plan

If what’s listed above isn’t feasible for you, consider an affordable insurance alternative like a discount dental plan. Our Careington 500 Plan is one such plan that can offer you significant savings on dental crowns. Although these Dental Plans are nationwide, here’s what you might pay if you live in California, New York and Texas:

California Careington Members

  • Crown – Resin-Based Composite (indirect): $245
  • Crown – Resin With High Noble Metal: $521
  • Crown – Porcelain Fused to High Noble Metal: $612
  • Crown – Porcelain Fused to Predominantly Base Metal: $550
  • Crown – Porcelain Fused to Noble Metal: $573
  • Crown – Full Cast High Noble Metal: $593
  • Crown – Full Cast Predominantly Base Metal: $517
  • Prefabricated Stainless Steel Crown – Primary Tooth: $138
  • Prefabricated Stainless Steel Crown – Permanent Tooth: $160

Additional Work for Crowns that May Be Needed:

  • Core Buildup – Including Any Pins: $139
  • Pin Retention Per Tooth in Addition to Restoration: $30
  • Post and Core in Addition to Crown, Indirectly Fabricated: $218
  • Prefabricated Post and Core in Addition to Crown: $172

New York Members

  • Crown – Resin-Based Composite (indirect): $259
  • Crown – Resin With High Noble Metal: $549
  • Crown – Porcelain Fused to High Noble Metal: $643
  • Crown – Porcelain Fused to Predominantly Base Metal: $585
  • Crown – Porcelain Fused to Noble Metal: $624
  • Crown – Full Cast High Noble Metal: $630
  • Crown – Full Cast Predominantly Base Metal: $593
  • Prefabricated Stainless Steel Crown – Primary Tooth: $134
  • Prefabricated Stainless Steel Crown – Permanent Tooth: $152

Additional Work for Crowns that May Be Needed:

  • Core Buildup – Including Any Pins: $134
  • Pin Retention Per Tooth in Addition to Restoration: $30
  • Post and Core in Addition to Crown, Indirectly Fabricated: $210
  • Prefabricated Post and Core in Addition to Crown: $164

Texas Members

  • Crown – Resin-Based Composite (indirect): $206
  • Crown – Resin With High Noble Metal: $435
  • Crown – Porcelain Fused to High Noble Metal: $511
  • Crown – Porcelain Fused to Predominantly Base Metal: $462
  • Crown – Porcelain Fused to Noble Metal: $483
  • Crown – Full Cast High Noble Metal: $502
  • Crown – Full Cast Predominantly Base Metal: $450
  • Prefabricated Stainless Steel Crown – Primary Tooth: $100
  • Prefabricated Stainless Steel Crown – Permanent Tooth: $114

Additional Work for Crowns that May Be Needed:

  • Core Buildup – Including Any Pins: $100
  • Pin Retention Per Tooth in Addition to Restoration: $25
  • Post and Core in Addition to Crown, Indirectly Fabricated: $158
  • Prefabricated Post and Core in Addition to Crown: $123

Disclaimer: The prices listed above reflect what you can expect to pay at a general dentist that accepts our Careington Care 500 plan, not at a specialist. Specialists in our Careington Care 500 network have agreed to a flat 20% off their prices, which may vary depending on the specialist you see.

Conclusion

As you can see, purchasing crowns without dental insurance can be difficult to do. Its high cost is probably not something you budgeted for, but don’t let the price stop you from getting this needed dental protector. Consider discount dental plans to help you save significantly on this dental work.

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